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Charlotte Dawson

Charlotte Dawson

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This is a list of characters and their interrelationships, with many hypertext links from and to the main text of Pride and Prejudice (it is based ultimately on the basic list of characters in Chapman's 1923 edition). Select the name of a character in the detailed alphabetical listing below to jump to the first meaningful appearance of that character in the novel. Other links are to significant descriptions of the major characters -- this list indexes passages which describe the appearances, personalities, and circumstances of the characters (but does not index the events in the novel as such; for this see the chronological index). The index to passages referring to the themes of "pride" and "prejudice" has additional insights into some of the characters.

  • The Bennets: Mr. Bennet, Mrs. Bennet, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Kitty, Lydia.
  • The Bingleys: Bingley, Louisa Hurst, Caroline.
  • Mr. Collins.
  • The Darcys: Old Mr. Darcy, Lady Anne Darcy, Darcy, Georgiana Darcy.
  • Lady Catherine, her daughter Anne de Bourgh.
  • Colonel Fitzwilliam.
  • Mr. Gardiner, Mrs. Gardiner.
  • The Lucases: Sir William, Lady Lucas, Charlotte, Maria.
  • Old Mr. Wickham, Wickham.
  • Minor Characters: Mrs. Annesley, Captain Carter, Mr. Chamberlayne, Dawson, Mr. Denny, Colonel Forster, William Goulding, Miss Grantley, Haggerston, The Harringtons, Mrs. Hill, Mr. Hurst, Mrs. Jenkinson, Mr. Jones, Miss Mary King, Mrs. Long, Lady Metcalfe, Mr. Morris, Mrs. Nicholls, Mr. Philips, Miss Pope, Mr. Pratt, Mrs. Reynolds, Mr. Robinson, Mr. Stone, Miss Watson, The Miss Webbs, Mrs. Younge.
See also the Genealogical Charts for Sense and Sensibility
And the Genealogical Charts for Emma
And the Genealogical Charts for Persuasion
And the Genealogical charts for Jane Austen's own family

Bennets, Philipses, and Gardiners

Mr. Collins is a cousin of Mr. Bennet (an explanation of the entail is available).

+--------------+---------------------------+ | | | | | | Mr. Bennet === Mrs. Bennet Mrs. Philips === Mr. Philips Edward === M---- | Gardiner | +--------+-+-----+-------+-------+ | | | | | | +--+--+--+ Jane Elizabeth Mary "Kitty" Lydia | | | | [Catherine] Four children

Darcys, Fitzwilliams, and De Bourghs

The individuals in parentheses died before the main action of the novel begins.

(Old Earl of ----, surnamed Fitzwilliam) | +------------+----+----------------+ | | | (Old Mr. === (Lady current Lady === (Sir Lewis Darcy) | Anne) Earl of ---- Catherine | de Bourgh) | | | +------+------+ +---+------+ | | | | | | Fitzwilliam Georgiana elder Colonel Anne de Darcy Darcy son(s) Fitzwilliam Bourgh

Lucases and Bingleys

Sir William === Lady +----------+----------+ Lucas | Lucas | | | | | | | +---------+----------+ Charles Caroline Louisa === Mr. | | | Bingley Bingley Hurst Charlotte Maria other boys Lucas Lucas and girls
  • Mrs. Annesley, companion to Georgiana Darcy.
  • The Bennets:
    • Mr. BENNET, of Longbourn-house in Hertfordshire; the estate was about £2,000 a year, and £5,000 was settled on his wife and children.
      • First description.
      • Second (longer) description of Mr. Bennet -- his relations with his wife.
      • Mrs. Bennet: He is always giving Elizabeth the preference.
      • Entail, Mr. Bennet's finances
      • "An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth..."
      • He so little likes Elizabeth's going from home for a stay, that "he told her to write to him, and almost promised to answer her letter."
      • He hates London.
      • Elizabeth: though he has "some peculiarities", he also "has abilities which Mr. Darcy himself need not disdain, and respectability which [Darcy] will probably never reach".
      • Wrote to Elizabeth in Kent, to hurry her return.
      • Elizabeth: He laughs at Kitty and Lydia's behaviour, rather than restraining them.
      • "I am glad you are come back, Lizzy."
      • "What, has [Lydia] frightened away some of your lovers?"
      • Elizabeth, despite being her father's favorite child, is aware of some of his faults as the head of his family.
      • Finances.
    • He married ---- Gardiner (Mrs. Bennet), daughter of a Meryton attorney, £4,000. (From the fact that she has been married 23 years, it can be deduced that she was almost certainly in her forties -- the prime marrying years for women were between ages 17 and 27.)
    • Their children:
    • Jane, 22. (Jane is often referred to simply as "Miss Bennet", according to the convention that the first name of the eldest unmarried daughter in a family is omitted after "Miss"; Elizabeth is sometimes addressed as "Miss Bennet" by the other characters, but the narrator never refers to her in that way.)
      • Elizabeth:"You never see a fault in anybody".
      • Considered the prettiest of the five Bennet daughters: Darcy, Elizabeth, Bingley (to Darcy), Bingley (overheard), Mr. Collins, and Mrs. Bennet: 1st 2nd.
        (According to one of Jane Austen's letters, of May 24th 1813, "Green was a favorite colour with her".)
      • "Though Jane would have defended either or both, had they appeared to be wrong", she can't explain Darcy and Wickham's antagonism.
      • She tries to clear both Darcy and Wickham.
      • She prefers to believe Caroline Bingley to be "incapable of wilfully deceiving any one".
      • Elizabeth: "My dear Jane! you are too good."
      • Elizabeth: "You shall not defend her, though it is Charlotte Lucas. You shall not, for the sake of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity..."
      • Jane has "no idea of there being so much design [scheming] in the world as some persons imagine."
      • "Let me take it in the best light"; i.e. Jane prefers to believe that she has been mistaken in supposing Bingley's affection for her, rather than that his sisters would designedly try to separate him from her, and he would be so easily swayed.
      • She is the only one who could suppose extenuating circumstances for Darcy with respect to Wickham's accusations.
      • She finally confesses herself to have been entirely deceived by Caroline Bingley, but pities "her because she must feel she has been acting wrong".
      • "I cannot understand it. If I were not afraid of judging harshly, I should be almost tempted to say that there is a strong appearance of duplicity in all this."
      • Jane subject to "periods of dejection"; "not in spirits", showing "a want of cheerfulness" unlike her usual "serenity".
      • Elizabeth thinks her fully worthy of Bingley, and that in opposing a Jane-Bingley match, Darcy can have no legitimate objections to Jane herself.
      • "What a stroke was this for poor Jane! who would willingly have gone through the world without believing that so much wickedness existed in the whole race of mankind, as was here collected in one individual."
      • Bingley was Jane's first love; she is unable to easily get over him.
      • Jane's "steady sense and sweetness of temper exactly adapted her for attending to [children] in every way -- teaching them, playing with them, and loving them".
      • She is "willing to hope the best" when she hears of Lydia's elopement with Wickham.
      • After hearing that Wickham and Lydia are probably not on their way to Gretna Green: "No one can throw any blame on Col. and Mrs. Forster"; "My father and mother believe the worst, but I cannot think so ill of" Wickham; "I know not what to think".
      • "'Tis too much! by far too much. I do not deserve it. Oh! why is not every body as happy?"
        Illustration <JPEG>
    • Elizabeth, 20. Her family calls her "Lizzy", her friends and neighbours call her "Eliza", and the narrator usually calls her "Elizabeth" (never "Miss Bennet").
      • Soon after the publication of Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen wrote about Elizabeth Bennet, "I must confess that I think her as delightful a character as ever appeared in print, and how I shall be able to tolerate those who do not like her at least, I do not know".
      • Description: She has a "lively playful disposition".
      • Her father thinks her "quickest".
      • Mrs. Bennet: Elizabeth "is not a bit better than the others"; she "is not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good humoured as Lydia".
      • Just as all we know about Darcy's physical appearance is that he is tall and handsome, there is little description of Elizabeth: only that she is pretty and has "dark eyes". Rather, other characters reveal themselves through praising or disparaging Elizabeth's looks. She is generally considered the second-prettiest of the five Bennet sisters; Darcy's famous snub; Reasons why Darcy starts to find her attractive; Darcy: "the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow"; Caroline Bingley maintains she has "no beauty" 1st. See also opinions on Elizabeth's looks later in the novel.
      • She doesn't ride horses (as Jane does), but is "lighter, and more in the habit of running" than Jane. (Thus Darcy considers Elizabeth's "figure to be light and pleasing".)
      • Elizabeth on Darcy: "He has a very satirical eye, and if I do not begin by being impertinent myself, I shall soon grow afraid of him."
      • Caroline Bingley and Mrs. Hurst abuse her for having "pride and impertinence", and for getting muddy walking two miles to visit her sick sister.
      • Her manner makes it difficult for her to affront Darcy.
      • Caroline Bingley considers her to possess "conceit and impertinence".
      • She loves to laugh at follies, etc.; loves absurdities.
      • "To Elizabeth it appeared, that had her family made an agreement to expose themselves as much as they could during the evening, it would have been impossible for them to play their parts with more spirit, or finer success".
      • Mr. Collins: Her "wit and vivacity" will be acceptable to Lady Catherine when tempered with "silence and respect".
      • "I do assure you that I am not one of those young ladies (if such young ladies there are) who are so daring as to risk their happiness on the chance of being asked a second time." (Here the author is getting in a little joke on her character.)
      • "Do not consider me now as an elegant female, but as a rational creature speaking the truth from her heart."
      • Mrs. Gardiner: Elizabeth would have "laughed herself out" of being disappointed in love sooner than Jane.
      • Elizabeth's courage does not fail her, on being about to meet Lady Catherine.
      • She "catches the fancy" of Colonel Fitzwilliam.
      • "You mean to frighten me, Mr. Darcy..."
        Illustration <JPEG>
      • Darcy: Elizabeth "finds great enjoyment in occasionally professing opinions which in fact are not her own."
      • Since "Colonel Fitzwilliam had made it clear that he had no intentions at all", Elizabeth "does not mean to be unhappy about him", "agreeable as he was"
      • Though flattered at Darcy's proposal, she never intends to accept him, and becomes angry when he tells her how degrading he feels it would be to be connected to her family.
      • Darcy's letter: He tells her obliquely that he suspects she has refused him because she is in love with Wickham.
      • Elizabeth ashamed of her misjudgements of Darcy and Wickham. "Till this moment, I never knew myself."
      • Elizabeth regrets her unjust accusations of Darcy, but still resents his manner of proposing, and doesn't regret having turned him down.
      • She is almost inclined to excuse Darcy's having separated Bingley and Jane when she sees Lydia and Kitty's behaviour on the impending departure of the militia regiment.
      • Darcy's housekeeper's praise of him throws an unexpected light on his character, and Elizabeth softens a little in her feelings toward him. See also topics list.
      • She is doubtful at first as to Darcy's feelings when witnessing his altered and improved behaviour at Pemberley; "Without looking farther, ... it was gratifying to know that his resentment had not made him think really ill of her"; "For to love, ardent love, it must be attributed".
      • At Lambton: Elizabeth tries to resolve her feelings towards Darcy. She thinks he would propose to her again if she encourages him.
      • As she becomes convinced that Darcy has given up all thoughts of her (after learning of Lydia's disgrace), "never had she so honestly felt that she could have loved him, as now, when all love must be vain".
      • Opinions on Elizabeth's looks later in the novel: Colonel Fitzwilliam finds her pretty; The jealous Caroline Bingley maintains she has "no beauty" 2nd; and unwisely reminds Darcy of the similar opinion he held on first meeting Elizabeth. Darcy: "one of the handsomest women of my acquaintance"; (later:) "loveliest Elizabeth". Elizabeth to Darcy: "My beauty you had early withstood".
    • Mary.
      • Description: "The only plain one in the family".
      • "Exposes herself" in front of Darcy by over-rating her musical accomplishments, to the disconcertment of Elizabeth.
      • Might have been prevailed upon to marry Mr. Collins.
      • Characteristic effusions: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th.
      • Jane Austen revealed to her family, according to the biographical Memoir, that Mary `obtained nothing higher than one of her uncle Philips's clerks' in marriage, after the period described in the novel.
    • Catherine ("Kitty"), two years older than Lydia. Description. Was `satisfactorily married to a clergyman near Pemberley' according to the Memoir.
    • Lydia, 15-16.
  • The Bingleys:
    • Charles BINGLEY, 22, £100,000; it is implied that he lived in London.
    • His sisters:
    • Louisa, £20,000, married Mr. Hurst, the elder of the two sisters;
    • Caroline, £20,000.
  • Captain Carter, of the ----shire Militia.
  • Mr. Chamberlayne, of the ----shire Militia.
  • The Rev. William COLLINS, Rector of Hunsford in Kent, cousin and heir to Mr. Bennet; 25; was at one of the Universities.
    • First impressions.
    • Description; Description by Elizabeth to Jane; Description by Elizabeth to Mrs. Gardiner.
    • The infamous marriage proposal: since he has more money than she does, he can't conceive of any grounds why she should refuse him, and so persistently disbelieves her refusal. See Marriage and Money in the topics list.
      Illustration <JPEG>
    • Advice to Elizabeth on dressing for her first visit to Rosings.
    • Mr. Collins generally speaks in clichés (often inappropriate), and is often described by the narrator in the same terms:
    • Mr. Collins's letter to Mr. Bennet on the elopement of Lydia is a most amazing production -- it's difficult to count the number of ways in which Mr. Collins manages to be offensive, apparently without being aware of it, in one medium-sized paragraph. (The novelist Trollope considered Mr. Collins's letters to be a comic masterpiece which "would move laughter in a low-church archbishop".)
      1. First off, it is not entirely clear that any letter at all from Mr. Collins is called for upon this occasion (cf. Elizabeth: "Assistance is impossible; condolence, insufferable -- let them triumph over us at a distance"); however, a proper letter would begin something along the lines of "Unfortunately, I could not help hearing about Lydia...", would probably be discreetly silent as to the exact source from which the letter-writer heard the news, and would scrupulously avoid any implication that the letter-writer himself has spread the scandal any further.
      2. Instead, Mr. Collins tells on the Lucases for spreading the news of the scandal to Hunsford.
      3. Then he tells on himself and Charlotte for scandalmongering to each other.
      4. And he tells on himself for scandalmongering to the De Bourghs.
      5. He then offers a little self-contradictory "consolation":
        He offers to "alleviate" Mr. Bennet's distress, whose cause, on the other hand, "no time can remove".
      6. He "comforts" Mr. Bennet by pointing out that "The death of your daughter would have been a blessing in comparison of this".
      7. He manages to blame both Lydia as intrinsically bad and the Bennet parents for being too indulgent (and in the process tells on Charlotte for blabbing the intimate details of the Bennet family).
      8. He oh-so-delicately informs Mr. Bennet that Lady Catherine thinks that this will ruin the chances of his other daughters marrying, and rejoices that he didn't marry Elizabeth after all.
  • Mr. DARCY the elder, of Pemberley in Derbyshire (died approximately five years before the novel begins), married Lady Anne Fitzwilliam (sister to Lady Catherine).
    • Fitzwilliam Darcy, his son, of Pemberley (and a town house not named), 28, £10,000 a year. (Explanation of why his first name is "Fitzwilliam".)
      • His description. It is mentioned that he is "tall": by Bingley, by Kitty, by Mrs. Bennet.
      • His behaviour at the Meryton assembly reveals his personality.
      • His famous snub of Elizabeth at the Meryton assembly. Illustration <JPEG>
      • Mrs. Bennet: Darcy "high and conceited".
      • His friendship with Bingley; contrast between his personality and Bingley's.
      • Admits Jane is pretty but thinks "she smiles too much".
      • He begins to be attracted to Elizabeth. Illustration <JPEG>
      • Mrs. Bennet considers his manners less agreeable and genteel than Sir William Lucas's.
      • He admits his faults of temper.
      • Elizabeth discovers his defect to be "implacable resentment"; "a propensity to hate everybody"
      • Lady Catherine intends Darcy to marry her daughter Anne: 1st. 2nd.
      • Even Wickham admits Darcy has some good qualities....
      • ...in his behaviour to his social inferiors.
      • ...in his behaviour to his sister.
      • ...in his behaviour to his social equals. (Hmm... Maybe you should begin to see a pattern here, Elizabeth?)
      • The Netherfield Ball: Elizabeth tells Darcy he is of "an unsocial taciturn disposition".
      • The Netherfield Ball: Elizabeth attempts to "illustrate" Darcy's character
      • The Netherfield Ball: Jane to Elizabeth: Bingley "will vouch for the good conduct, the probity and honour" of Darcy.
      • Everybody in the Meryton neighbourhood is "pleased to think how much they had always disliked Mr. Darcy before they had known any thing of" Wickham's accusations against him; Darcy is "condemned as the worst of men".
      • Elizabeth thinks that "that abominable Mr. Darcy's" former bad treatment and impoverishment of Wickham is the main reason why she cannot consider marrying Wickham.
      • Elizabeth sees a resemblance between Darcy and his aunt, Lady Catherine.
      • Lady Catherine speaks of him "in terms of the highest admiration".
      • He is "a little ashamed of" Lady Catherine's "ill breeding".
      • "I am ill qualified to recommend myself to strangers"; "I have not the talent of conversing easily with those I have never seen before."
      • Elizabeth discerns no signs of any love by Darcy for Anne de Bourgh.
      • Charlotte suspects Darcy is in love with Elizabeth.
      • Darcy silent and dull; Charlotte doubts he is in love with Elizabeth.
      • Darcy several times encounters and walks with Elizabeth in Rosings Park.
      • Elizabeth thinks Darcy is hinting that Colonel Fitzwilliam will probably propose to her.
      • Elizabeth thinks that Darcy objected to the "ungentlemanly" occupations of her and Jane's uncles, when he separated Jane and Bingley.
      • The infamous proposal -- He frankly confesses how his love for her has overcome his sense that a marriage to her would be degrading because of her inferior family.
      • He is surprised and angry at her rejection of his proposal.
      • Darcy refuses to disguise his mixed feelings with flattery even in making a marriage proposal.
      • Elizabeth tells him his present manner is ungentlemanlike, and that his manners have made a negative impression on her from the beginning of their acquaintance.
      • Darcy's letter: He is already making excuses for Elizabeth's believing Wickham.
      • Elizabeth realizes that she doesn't objectively know much in Darcy's disfavor except for his "proud manner" (leaving aside his separating Bingley and Jane).
      • Elizabeth thinks that if she had married Darcy, he wouldn't allow her to invite the Gardiners to Pemberley, because of Mr. Gardiner's "ungentlemanly" occupation.
      • Darcy's housekeeper's praise of him surprises Elizabeth.
      • Encounter at Pemberley: Elizabeth has "never in her life she seen his manners so little dignified", and he has "never spoken with such gentleness".
      • described by Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner; "But to be sure, the good lady who shewed us the house did give him a most flaming character!".
      • Elizabeth is doubtful as to Darcy's feelings when witnessing his altered and improved behaviour at Pemberley
      • The Darcys' call at Lambton: Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner have no doubt that Darcy does love her: 1st. 2nd.
      • The Darcys' call at Lambton: His improvement in manners continues; Elizabeth still surprised.
      • The Gardiners become "anxious to think well" of him after they think he is interested in Elizabeth.
      • Elizabeth thinks that the news of Lydia's disgrace destroys "her power" with Darcy.
    • Darcy's sister Georgiana, 16, £30,000. She is tall (like her brother); she is "rather taller" than Elizabeth; "though little more than sixteen, her figure was formed, and her appearance womanly and graceful".
  • Dawson, Lady Catherine's maid.
  • Sir Lewis DE BOURGH, knight, of Rosings Park in Kent.
  • Mr. Denny, of the ----shire Militia.
  • Colonel Fitzwilliam, younger son of the Earl of ----, nephew of Lady Catherine de Bourgh and of Lady Anne Darcy.
  • Colonel Forster, commanding the ----shire Militia; description; married Harriet ----. Description.
  • Edward GARDINER, of Gracechurch-street, brother of Mrs. Bennet.
  • The Gouldings (William named) of Haye-Park.
  • Miss Grantley, an acquaintance of Caroline Bingley.
  • Haggerston, an attorney.
  • Miss Harriet and Miss "Pen" Harrington, acquaintances of Mrs. Forster and Lydia.
  • Mrs. Hill, housekeeper at Longbourn.
  • Mr. Hurst, of Grosvenor-street; description; married Louisa Bingley.
  • Mrs. Jenkinson, Miss de Bourgh's companion. Non-description. Her four nieces.
  • John, the Collins's servant.
  • John, the Gardiners' servant.
  • Mr. Jones, apothecary at Meryton.
  • Miss Mary King, heiress of £10,000. Description; no longer courted by Wickham.
  • Mrs. Long; her two nieces.
  • Sir William LUCAS, knight, of Lucas Lodge. (See an an explanation of aristocratic honorific prefixes such as "Sir".)
      • Description: his knighthood "had given him a disgust to his business and to his residence in a small market town; and quitting them both, he had removed with his family to a house about a mile from Meryton, ... where he could think with pleasure of his own importance, and, unshackled by business, occupy himself solely in being civil to all the world". What this means is that Sir William Lucas is an irresponsible parent -- he has taken on the airs of gentility without the ability to give his children (except possibly the eldest son) the necessary wealth to support this status; the effect of this on Charlotte is seen in her marriage. If Sir William had been more responsible, he would have done what the father or grandfather of the Bingleys did -- keep working until definitely wealthy, and then let the next generation be "genteel".
      • Mrs. Bennet considers his manners more agreeable and genteel than Darcy's.
      • Characteristic effusion.
      • His absurdities are worn out with Elizabeth.
      • Awe at meeting Lady Catherine.
      • Preparing for future name-dropping at Lady Catherine's.
    • Lady Lucas; Description. (See an an explanation of the different uses of aristocratic honorific prefixes such as "Lady".)
    • Their children:
    • Charlotte, 27, the eldest.
      • Description.
      • Advice to Elizabeth on attracting men, re Jane.
      • Philosophy of happiness in marrying.
      • Prudential advice to Elizabeth on not not appearing unpleasant to a rich man like Darcy for a relatively poor one like Wickham.
      • She accepts Mr. Collins for `the pure and disinterested desire of an establishment'.
      • "But still, he would be her husband."
      • "I am not a romantic, you know."
      • Elizabeth: Charlotte has "sacrificed every better feeling to worldly advantage".
      • Elizabeth "persuaded that no real confidence could ever subsist" between her and Charlotte again; "all the comfort of intimacy was over".
      • Husband management skills: 1st. 2nd. 3rd.
      • From "Charlotte's evident enjoyment, Elizabeth supposed [Charlotte's husband] must be often forgotten."
      • Elizabeth thinks that Charlotte and her husband spend so much time ingratiating themselves with Lady Catherine because she may be able eventually to increase Charlotte's husband's income; Charlotte might prefer Elizabeth to marry Darcy, since, unlike Colonel Fitzwilliam, "Mr. Darcy had considerable patronage in the church" (i.e. could also increase her husband's income).
      • Elizabeth talks to Darcy about Charlotte's marriage.
      • Charlotte thinks that all Elizabeth's dislike for Darcy would "vanish, if she could suppose him" to be in love with her.
      • Happiness in marriage: Elizabeth pities Charlotte, but Charlotte "had chosen it with her eyes open".
      • She is pregnant; secretly rejoices in Elizabeth's engagement.
    • Maria.
    • Younger Miss Lucases.
    • A boy. One or more other boy(s).
  • Lady Metcalfe, an acquaintance of Lady Catherine.
  • Mr. Morris.
  • Mrs. Nicholls, housekeeper at Netherfield.
  • Mr. Philips, attorney in Meryton; married Miss ---- Gardiner.
  • Miss Pope, governess in Lady Metcalfe's family.
  • Mr. Pratt, of the ----shire Militia.
  • Mrs. Reynolds, housekeeper at Pemberley.
  • Mr. Robinson, of the Meryton neighbourhood.
  • Sally/Sarah (in chapters 47 and 55, respectively -- may be the same individual), servant(s).
  • Mr. Stone, Mr. Gardiner's clerk?
  • Miss Watson, of Meryton.
  • The Miss Webbs, acquaintances of Lady Catherine.
  • Mr. WICKHAM, steward to old Mr. Darcy.
    • His son George; Lieutenant in the ----shire Militia; went to Cambridge.
  • Mrs. Younge, former governess or companion to Georgiana Darcy.



Charlotte Dawson photos

Charlotte Dawson photos

Charlotte Dawson photos

Charlotte Dawson photos

Charlotte Dawson photos

Charlotte Dawson photos

Charlotte Dawson photos

Charlotte Dawson photos